Month: October 2014

Procrastination Style: Social Procrastination

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Social Procrastination is often it the result of a lack of development in the following Emotional Intelligence areas:

  • Assertiveness
  • Self-Regard
  • Impulse Control

Essentially, social procrastination is described as committing to a social responsibility (doing something for someone else) and then avoiding the task. Have you ever wondered why you commit to something and then feel resentful, or not follow through or not sure why you committed to something that you don’t even want to do? This can be explained through the above 3 areas of Emotional Intelligence.

  • Assertiveness: involves communicating feelings, beliefs and thoughts openly, and defending personal rights and values in a socially acceptable, non-offensive, and non-destructive manner.

Often people who commit to do something they don’t want to do, may not know “how to say no” in a respectful way. They may not take responsibility for managing their own life, for example, “they should never have asked me to do this!”. People have the right to ask and you have the right to say “no” and set healthy boundaries.

  • Self-Regard: Self-Regard is respecting oneself while understanding and accepting one’s strengths and weaknesses. Self-Regard is often associated with feelings of inner strength and self-confidence.

Often people who say “yes” to something they wish they had not, do not feel that they have the right to say “no”, or if they do, people will not like them. You do have the right to say no and you can do this in a very respectful way. “Thanks so much for considering me for this project/task, I really wish I could help you out, but I am so busy at this time”. If you always say “yes” so that people will like you, you will become the “go to” person, you may become overwhelmed and may become so angry that it effects the relationship adversely. True friends are understanding and it is your job to set healthy boundaries for yourself.

  • Impulse Control is the ability to resist or delay an impulse, drive or temptation to act and involves avoiding rash behaviors and decision-making

This is an interesting area of Emotional Intelligence Development. Often impulse control is linked to negative behaviours such as gambling, addiction and spending money; however, impulse control issues can sneak up on you with positive behaviors. There are so many cool things to learn and be involved with in this life and when something exciting is presented to you, it is tough to say “no”. Often people just instinctual say “yes” without considering the impact on their time or if it is even a task they want to do. People can impulsively say “yes” to be liked, to have the life experience, worried that they will never be asked again, etc. It is important to explore if you are saying “yes” because you have the time, the inclination and the need to participate prior to committing.

Today…

Take some time today to reflect on the times where you socially procrastinate. There are some interesting emotional indicators such as feeling resentful, angry that they asked you, guilty that you feel angry/resentful, anxious, avoiding by sleeping, scared to even start the task and finding many other tasks to do to delay starting. What are you experiencing?

For more information on building your Emotional Intelligence, check out the Modules in eLearn under “SuccessCoaching@MohawkCollege” (start with the Self Registration tab). I would love your feedback, feel free to comment, email me directly or book an appointment for more personalized assistance.

Your Success Coach,

Dr. Heather Drummond, Ed.D. (Counselling Psychology)

Success Coach * Professor * Counsellor

Mohawk College-Fennell Campus-“The Square“-C102/20

heather.drummond@mohawkcollege.ca

Quick Learning Strategy Tip! A Simple Mindset that Encourages Long-Term Memory

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Learn it Like You Will Be Teaching it!

Recent research by Nestojko, Bui, Kornell & Bjork (2014) explored the effect a mindset can have on learning. What they found is that people who are learning new information with the intention of teaching it to someone else retained more information that those who where just learning it for a test.

The Researchers Explain…

“When compared to learners expecting a test, learners expecting to teach recalled more material correctly, they organized their recall more effectively and they had better memory for especially important information.The immediate implication is that the mindset of the student before and during learning can have a significant impact on learning, and that positively altering a student’s mindset can be effectively achieved through rather simple instructions.”

For you PsychNerds like me, this is called “Relational Processing”. This is yet more research supporting that we often function better as connected human beings.

Today…

When you are studying today, think about teaching what you have learned to someone else. Focus on the main points that you would need to tell the other person so that they understand. Try it! This is a super easy way to make your studying easier and more effective.

Your mindset can help to decrease the amount of times that you need to go over the material to learn it.

Less study time = More time for fun!


I look forward to hearing from you!
Dr. Heather Drummond, EdD Counselling Psychology

Success Coach * Professor * Counsellor

Mohawk College, Fennel Campus, The Square – C102/20

heather.drummond@mohawkcollege.ca


Source: Nestojko, J. F., Bui, D. C., Kornell, N., and Bjork, E. L. (2014) Expecting to teach enhances learning and organization of knowledge in free recall text passages. Memory & Cognition, 42(7), 1038-1048

Procrastination Style: Behavioural

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The Secret to Getting Ahead

Behavioural Procrastination Pattern

For those of you who completed the Procrastination Survey, your results will indicate which of the 14 Procrastination Patterns you need the most improvement in.

Behavioural Procrastinators tend to have excellent “big picture thinking”, have the ability to create outstanding plans and organizational skills; however, the difficulty lies in the “doing”.

The behavioural procrastinator gets right to the brink of implementation but waits for inspiration to kick in. Planning is the fun part, the doing is the dreaded part.

Ask yourself the following questions to get a better idea of your procrastination challenge in this area: 

Avoidance: What do you typically do to avoid getting started?

Justification: What do you tell yourself to justify why you are not getting started?

Actions: What actions can you take to follow through and get started?

Some Words of Advice…

Avoidance Strategies: people typically find themselves either doing very unpleasant things like cleaning up their living space or fun things like watching TV or playing video games.

Try This: once you have figured out what you are doing that contributes to your procrastination, work it into your action plan. You will work better if you are “permitted” to have some fun in balance with getting your work done.

Justification: often people are fearful of getting started for many reasons such as failure, dislike for feeling overwhelmed and not knowing where to begin.

Try This…The best thing that you can do with a college assignment is to create the study space, gather the tools that you need, open your books and get started with a “brain dump”. Just start writing everything that you need to get done for this assignment (list), what information your already know and create an outline. Allow yourself a break once you have done this. Get it out of your head, let your brain relax, do something fun and then get back to it now that you know the map.

Actions: Sometimes you just need to shut off your thoughts and the focus on how unpleasant this assignment will be to finish and just get going. Work first, get it done so that you can really enjoy yourself. Create the rough copy and come back to it later with “fresh eyes” and a rested brain.

Next Week’s Procrastination Topic: Social Procrastination

I look forward to hearing from you!

Dr. Heather Drummond, EdD Counselling Psychology

Success Coach * Professor * Counsellor

Mohawk College, Fennel Campus, The Square – C102/20

heather.drummond@mohawkcollege.ca

Procrastination Survey – Take it and Figure out Your Procrastination Patterns!!

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There is an excellent book that I use all the time with students called, The Procrastination Workbook by William Knaus, Ed.D. I highly recommend buying it if you are really serious about curbing your procrastination. I will be using the Procrastination Survey from this book and sharing strategies to work with the 14 Procrastination Patterns and the 6 Procrastination Triggers.

Procrastination Workbook

Take the Procrastination Survey so that you have a better idea of you patterns and triggers. I will start blogging about these next week.

 Procrastination Survey

I would love to hear from you, feel free to contact me if you would like to chat further about the posts!

Your Success Coach,

Dr. Heather Drummond, Ed.D. (Counselling Psychology)

Success Coach * Professor * Counsellor

Mohawk College-Fennell Campus-“The Square“-C102/20

heather.drummond@mohawkcollege.ca

Are You a Procrastinator?

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Procrastinator is a negative label that so many people use; often it is not what describes their behaviour at all. Waiting until the last minute to get an assignment done, does not necessary make you a procrastinator. Leaving something to the last minute and not handing it in could mean that procrastination is a problem for you.

People have different personality types; which also means that they have different preferences in terms of how they get things done. Some people prefer to be scheduled, methodical and have clear plans; other people prefer to be flexible, open-ended and prefer that their plans are left to unfold. Both approaches are good; they just have different ways of getting stuff done. Some people prefer to get things done ahead of time; others feel energized by last minute pressures. Both are good; just different approaches.

MindTools.com provides an excellent quiz to determine if you are a Procrastinator

take it now!

Next week, I will provide an assessment that will help you to determine the underlying reasons why you procrastinate. Once you know some of the reasons, it will be easier to target the problem and work on solutions. I will be introducing strategies to cope with the many underlying reasons for procrastination.

Your Success Coach,

Heather Drummond, M.Ed. (Counselling Psychology)

Success Coach * Professor * Counsellor

Mohawk College-Fennell Campus-“The Square“-C102/20

heather.drummond@mohawkcollege.ca

Emotional Intelligence: Procrastination – Why You Do it…

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“You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow

by evading it today” – Abraham Lincoln

Starting today, I will be blogging about Procrastination. On Mondays I will link it to fostering your Emotional Intelligence and Wednesdays will be dedicated to building skills to deal with procrastination.

Often the reasons we put off tasks can be linked to fears of failure, being unfamiliar with success, avoiding that which controls us and so on. There are many reasons people procrastinate. Over the next few weeks, I will be blogging about all these different reasons to help you figure out what your procrastination triggers or precursors are and strategies to address your procrastinating. For today, I leave you with three guiding questions. These three questions can help us to move through being stuck and get on with it.

Ask Yourself a Few Hard Questions

Where are you now? 

What is in the way? 

Where do you need to go? 

Most people tend to jump right into ‘Where do you need to go?’ versus really looking at the obstacles and dealing with them directly. This is just the start. Keep these questions in mind as I explore “What is in the way?” and learn how to get yourself moving through those barriers.

Your Success Coach,

Heather Drummond, M.Ed. (Counselling Psychology)

Success Coach * Professor * Counsellor

Mohawk College-Fennell Campus-“The Square“-C102/20

heather.drummond@mohawkcollege.ca